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Leitner law center news
Announcement of 2008-2009 Crowley Scholars

Amal Bouhabib
Corey Calabrese
Amelia “Millie” Canter
Benjamin Goldstein
Noushin Ketabi
Ganesh Krishna
David Mandel-Anthony
Amisha Sharma

Amal Bouhabib
After graduating from Georgetown University with a degree in Theology, Amal moved to Beirut, Lebanon, where she worked for two years as a journalist for a daily paper. As a reporter, Amal wrote about social and cultural issues in the Middle East, particularly Lebanon. Following her career as a journalist, Amal received her M.A. in journalism and Near East Studies from New York University. After a brief stint with the U.N. in Beirut working as a communications director for the Women’s Center, Amal returned to New York where she worked as a Research Associate for the Justice Program at the Brennan Center, focusing on litigation aimed at enhancing indigent defense in Michigan. In the summer of 2008, Amal worked as a legal intern at the ACLU on national security, human rights and first amendment issues. Amal is also a staff member of the Fordham International Law Journal.

Corey Calabrese
Corey graduated with a B.A. from the University of Notre Dame in May 2006. She has a strong interest in international human rights law and women’s rights. During her college summer breaks she kindled this passion by interning at the Brooklyn District Attorney’s Office in the Domestic Violence Bureau, the National Organization for Women, and Equality Now. Corey spent a year after graduation serving Hurricane Katrina victims as a Family Services Representative for the New Orleans Area Habitat for Humanity.

As a law student Corey is involved in many public interest organizations. She is a Stein Scholar for Public Interest Law & Ethics and the Class of 2010 Representative to the Stein Council, Co-President of Amnesty International, Finance Officer for Universal Jurisdiction, and Co-Founder of the Civil Legal Advice and Resource Office Student Group. She is a staff member on the International Law Journal. She spent summer 2008 interning at the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York in the Civil Division.

Amelia “Millie” Canter
Amelia (“Millie”) Canter was born in the United States but grew up overseas, living in France, Norway, England and Australia. She graduated from Harvard University in 2007, with an A.B. in History. Her honors thesis, entitled “This Will Happen to You: An Examination of Photography from the Mau Mau Uprising, 1952-1960,” discussed British imagery of the Mau Mau rebellion in 1950’s Kenya and in the process, explored the larger question of the role of emerging human rights law within Britain’s counterinsurgency campaign. While at Harvard, Millie was a varsity coach for MetroLacrosse, a sports-based character education program for children in inner-city Boston. During the summer of 2006, she interned with the Aboriginal Legal Services of Western Australia, an organization which provides free legal aid to Perth’s indigenous population.

At Fordham, Millie is on the staff of the Fordham International Law Journal and is a member of the Gotham Women’s Lacrosse Team. Following her first year of law school, Millie interned with the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, working with judges and legal officers on The Prosecutor v. Casimir Bizimungu et al (“Government II”) case.

Benjamin Goldstein
Ben graduated from Brown University in 2003, earning a B.A. in psychology. After graduation, Ben spent two years living in Ecuador. During his first year in Ecuador, Ben worked through the Mojanda Foundation as a volunteer teacher in a rural, indigenous community in the Andes. Subsequently, Ben lived in Quito and worked as a paralegal for the Amazon Defense Coalition (ADC). The ADC represents over 30,000 plaintiffs, including five indigenous groups, in a landmark human rights and environmental trial against the Chevron Corporation, for their pollution of the Ecuadorian Amazon. In addition to his time in Ecuador, Ben spent two years at the Summit Children’s Residence Center as an assistant teacher for adolescents with emotional and developmental disabilities.

Following Ben’s first year in law school, he interned at the Office of the Georgia Capital Defender, working on several death penalty cases. At Fordham, he is a Stein Scholar for the Public Interest and member of the Fordham Urban Law Journal.

Noushin Ketabi
Noushin graduated from the University of California at Berkeley with a Political Science degree. Her honors thesis focused on the role of the Internet in the political participation process. While at Berkeley, Noushin interned at the Office of United States Senator Barbara Boxer, assisting caseworkers with immigration and housing claims. Additionally, she was an intern at the California Climate Action Registry, where she conducted a survey of greenhouse gas registries on an international scale and participated in member outreach. Upon graduation, Noushin spent time teaching English in Costa Rica, and then worked from May 2005 to August 2007 at the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) in San Francisco working on water policy in the Western United States, and New York City focusing on the Northeastern United States’ Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI). While at NRDC, she co-authored the report, “In Hot Water: How Water Managers Can Weather the Effects of Global Warming” (accessible here: http://www.nrdc.org/globalwarming/hotwater/contents.asp). Noushin spent her 1L summer interning at the Center for Human Rights and the Environment (CEDHA) in Córdoba, Argentina preparing a report on the human rights abuses of environmental defenders in Latin America as well as an analysis on climate change’s effects in the region. She continues to work with CEDHA remotely, and is also a Stein Scholar in Public Interest and Ethics, a staff member of the International Law Journal, and a faculty research assistant. In conjunction with her J.D. degree, Noushin is pursuing a Masters degree in International Political Economy and Development at Fordham.

Ganesh Krishna
Prior to starting law school, Ganesh received his Masters’ degree in Social Policy and Planning from the London School of Economics. He received the Sri Ratan Tata Trust Fellowship for his dissertation titled, “Theory vs. Reality: A Case Study of Poverty in Bangalore.” The dissertation studied the social impact of Bangalore’s recent economic growth on poverty stricken areas throughout the city. After obtaining his degree, Ganesh worked as a Research Associate in Harvard Business School’s Entrepreneurial Management division.

Concurrently, over the past three years, Ganesh has founded and continues to work on a startup company based out of India, Anantha Renewable Energy. His company aims to produce biofuels in India composed of non-food based crops, which will provide an additional source of income for local farmers. The feedstock will be grown primarily by small land-holding farmers in low-irrigation areas of India.

Ganesh obtained his B.S. with honors from Indiana University, Kelley School of Business. His senior honors thesis studied the use of the Alien Tort Claims Act as a legal basis for trying international human rights abuses. During the summer of his junior year, Ganesh interned with the Dallas Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA), where he worked on finding safe and permanent homes for abused and neglected children in the Dallas area. During his time at Indiana, Ganesh was also deemed a Lord Rothermere Scholar and a Freeman Foundation Scholar, which allowed him the opportunity to study at Oxford University and contribute to a research study in Tokyo, Japan.

David Mandel-Anthony
David graduated from UT-Austin in 2005, with a B.A. in Plan II Honors. His senior thesis, “Transnational Mam: From Comitancillo to Carthage,” combined ethnography and advocacy in a study of Mayan-Guatemalan poultry plant workers in Mississippi. After graduation, David worked at Humanity in Action in New York and Amsterdam, planning and directing a trans-Atlantic human rights fellowship program on Holocaust resistance and contemporary minority integration; and at the Res Publica, a civil society capacity-building consultancy, where he managed a project for the Gates Foundation on e-advocacy initiatives in developing countries. Prior to law school, David interned in The Hague at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, Office of the Prosecution, on the ICTY v. Ante Gotovina (et al) case.

During his first year of law school, David interned with the International Center for Transitional Justice, tracking UN peace building initiatives and consulting on ICTJ’s global alumni planning. He attended the UN Human Rights Council 7th Session in Geneva as an assistant to an NGO delegate. Following his first year, David was selected to be an Ella Baker Summer Legal Fellow with the Center for Constitutional Rights. He is a Stein Scholar, a staff member of the Fordham International Law Journal, and Co-President of the Fordham Amnesty International Chapter.

Amisha Sharma
Amisha was born in Brooklyn, NY and grew up in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. She received a dual degree in Religious Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies from Louisiana State University in 2001. She also holds a master’s degree in Latin American Studies from Tulane University. Her master’s thesis focused on civil society in post-conflict Guatemala, and the demands of different social groups on the democratic state. Before starting law school, she worked at the University of Florida, as an international student advisor and as the outreach coordinator for the Asian Studies Program.

At Fordham, Amisha is a board member of Law Students for Reproductive Justice. She is a Stein Scholar, and a member of the Immigration Advocacy Project and Prisoners’ Rights Advocates. In the summer of 2008, she worked as an intern in the chambers of the Honorable Laura Taylor Swain, in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. In fall 2008, she will be working with the Center for Reproductive Rights as a legal intern. She is also a volunteer with Planned Parenthood of New York City’s Activist Council.


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Leitner Center for International Law and Justice
Fordham University School of Law
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Chi Adanna Mgbako
Clinical Professor of Law
Director, Walter Leitner International Human Rights Clinic
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